Poker Pro Daniel Cates Proposes Outing of Noncompliant Debtors

Written by:
Ace King
Published on:
Jun/10/2024

Poker pro Daniel Cates this past weekend offered to verify the amount of debt owed by fellow noncompliant poker players.  It's an issue that has resulted in numerous accusations of scamming within the tight knit community.

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Cates, who goes by the name Jungleman, tweeted:

"If anyone would like to out their debtors that are not compliant I am willing to do so if I can verify the debt and the lack of compliancy (sic) or confront them directly.

"Same with cheating and other bad behaviours that are not accounted for

"I understand my history isn’t perfect and in fact I owe some money. The main theme is forward progression and accountability. No need to shame people for their mistakes as long as they make things right and stop their bad behaviour

"Few others are doing anything about the active problems in poker so I have decided to for our collective benefit."

Jungleman is in the process of considering where to place the list.  He also expressed concerns over transparency while emphasizing the list would only be of players who are non-compliant, not just those owing money to others.

Cates in the past has laid out the debts and the obstacles that have limited his bankroll.  Back in 2014, he claimed that a single player, Dave Lerner, owed him $1.9 million.

One person Cates would rethink about outing is fellow pro Tom Dwan.  Cates has been critical of Dwan in past years, even calling him a "scammer" at one point.  More recently he's changed his tune. 

"Re the @TomDwan. drama, I have realized is that in fact he does intend on paying back his debts and has worked tirelessly towards that

"I think he has made a lot of mistakes but also had some fucked up things happen to him, and I think it's important to focus on the most mutually beneficial outcome."

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